Case study – You can have my employees, interested?

In every industry there is a high demand for IT professionals, particularly in the system administration field. These are the people who keep your server infrastructure alive, configuring and deploying new systems, performing troubleshooting, etc. Demand for skills has led to the creation of more “fancy” job titles like “platform engineer”, “devops engineer” or “cloud engineer” as a way of attracting more candidates.

Hiring the right people is always hard. To find genuinely talented individuals for an entry-level job is even harder. You will always receive plenty of applications and calls from recruiters with “the best pool of talent” but sometimes their “best” is below-average. Worse still, you may hire someone only to discover that he or she is not really interested in this type of job after all. Which puts you back onto the recruitment treadmill.

The good news is that there are still smart people eager to get into IT. They have spent many hours of their free time to learn about administering and troubleshooting Linux, databases and other data centre technologies. But they may struggle to find a job because their lack of workplace experience. In my own case, when I first started out in IT, I didn’t have any computer science degree (I still don’t). Finding my first IT jobs was difficult – but as I acquired more “real world” experience, more and more opportunities became available.

For human beings continuous development and learning is essential to happiness. For technically-minded people it is even more important to always learn something new and interesting. To achieve this goal we might need to change jobs regularly. Sometimes as often as every 6 months.

At Data Centre Professionals we provide our clients with technicians for maintenance and deployment tasks. Really these are entry level positions in IT. The work is physical but not everybody can do it. Effective data centre technicians must understand computer hardware, have a working knowledge of Linux, basic networking concepts and an understanding of enterprise level infrastructure design.

This sounds like a sysadmin skill set. Indeed these are the foundations required to make the step-up to system administration – they just need to expand their learning and experience. For Data Centre Professionals, the only “problem” is our company cannot offer that opportunity to move up to sysadmin level.

So what can DCP do?

I can try to trick, bribe or blackmail my employee in order to convince them to stay as long as possible. But I think this is a lose-lose situation in the long term.

Instead I accept that this is the way of (IT) life and prepare for it. I hire talented and eager individuals who looking for their first “proper” IT job. I help them develop their practical knowledge and give them a chance to work in a live data centre environment and prove their skillset. Once they have proven themselves, we offer them to companies who can take them to the next level in their career. Which is a win-win situation for the employee and DCP customers.

Ready to solve your onsite data centre staffing problems? Please get in touch.

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